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With our rights in the crosshairs, the vice president-elect is exactly the kind of feminist figurehead we need right now

Kamala Harris
Kamala Harris
Photo illustration, source: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris has just shattered a number of ceilings: On Saturday, she became the first woman, the first Black woman, and the first Indian-American woman to be elected vice president of the United States. After days of tensely counting votes, and four years of horrific racism and misogyny from the Trump administration, Harris’ elevation is more than just a win — it’s a salve for those of us who have been so discouraged by the bigotry of our fellow citizens, and a symbol for an American future that doesn’t look quite so homogenous.

I’ll admit, of course, that I…


From D.C. to the Northern Mariana Islands, the convention’s roll call was a reminder of the strength and beauty of America’s diversity

Rep. Veronica Escobar announces the Texas delegates during the virtual convention on August 18, 2020. Photo: Handout/DNCC via Getty Images

If you had said that the Democratic National Convention’s roll call would make us smile for more than 30 minutes straight, our cynical selves would have laughed. But that’s exactly what happened on the second evening of the Democrats’ national, and online, gathering.

The roll call of the states has always been one of the quirkiest parts of the quadrennial event. In it, delegates from across the country officially cast their votes to nominate a presidential candidate. But this is an unconventional convention, as DNC Chair Tom Perez said, and it made for one of the most powerful moments of…


The opening night of the DNC showcased Republicans and socialists and dire warnings about Trump. Whatever happened to inspiring voters?

In this screenshot from the livestream of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, actress and activist Eva Longoria introduces former first lady Michelle Obama to address the virtual convention on August 17, 2020. Photo: Handout/DNCC via Getty Images

The 2020 Democratic National Convention that got underway Monday night featured socialists and Republicans, former Donald Trump voters and Black Lives Matter activists, small-business people and CEOs. There was one of the chief architects of the Green New Deal—and a recovering climate skeptic. There were speeches delivered on a lectern and speeches recorded in living rooms. The vision for the Democratic Party under Joe Biden’s leadership offered at Monday night’s kickoff of the 2020 DNC was, for better or worse, one of far-reaching ideological inclusivity.

Former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, former Rep. Susan Molinari, former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd…


Column

Bernie Sanders won in New Hampshire. But that won’t stop the old guard from pretending like it still doesn’t matter.

Sen. Bernie Sanders after winning the New Hampshire Primary on February 11, 2020, in Manchester, New Hampshire. Photo: The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire last night. As it stands right now, Sanders is the odds-on favorite to win the Democratic nomination at FiveThirtyEight, at RealClearPolitics, or at whatever other political sportsbook suits your fancy. He’s gonna win this thing. But before he does, we’re gonna be forced to hear every last Establishment pud tell you why he can’t or why he shouldn’t, and then you’ll hear them interpret the returns in the least favorable way possible for him. (Wow, such a strong showing tonight for Not Bernie with nearly 75% of the votes!) That goes for Sanders’ rival candidates…


Many of Harris’ wounds were self-inflicted, but her downfall also shows just how much Trump’s racism and sexism have influenced the 2020 playing field

Photo: The Washington Post/Getty Images

Kamala Harris’ presidential campaign started with a bang, and ended with a whimper.

When the senator from California launched her campaign in January, some 20,000 people showed up at a rally in Oakland to hear her speak. But a nosedive in fundraising after months of lagging in the polls proved insurmountable for someone who once was seen as one of the leading 2020 candidates. “I’ve taken stock and looked at this from every angle, and over the last few days have come to one of the hardest decisions of my life,” Harris wrote in a Medium post announcing she was…


Freakonomics Radio

We all know our political system is “broken” — but what if that’s not true? Some say the Republicans and Democrats constitute a wildly successful industry that has colluded to kill off competition, stifle reform, and drive the country apart. So, what are you going to do about it?

Photo: Omar Chatriwala/Getty Images

A few weeks ago, Michigan congressman Justin Amash announced that he was leaving the Republican Party to become an independent. Amash said the partisan rancor in Washington, D.C., was just too much and counterproductive; he also said he has long had concerns about the country’s two-party system.

For decades, we’ve been hearing from both sides of the aisle that Washington is “broken.” But what if the Washington-is-broken idea is just a line? Maybe even a slogan that the country’s two dominant political parties approved? What if they’re just selling and we’re buying? What if it’s not broken at all? …


Sanders supporters are still haunted by the ghosts of 2016’s primary battles

Photo: Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty

On Saturday, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders issued a sharp public rebuke to the Center for American Progress, an influential left-leaning think tank with significant ties to Hillary Clinton.

His letter, addressed to the board of the CAP and its associated action fund, took the group to task for articles published on ThinkProgress criticizing Sanders and fellow Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker. In particular, he slammed CAP executive director Neera Tanden, former policy director for Hillary Clinton and later domestic policy director for Barack Obama. …


Howard Dean. Photography by Justin Kaneps

He represented the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party. Then the party changed.

On November 10, 2016, two days after Donald Trump was elected president, Howard Dean declared his candidacy for the chair of the Democratic National Committee. “Fuck off, lobbyist,” came one reply on Twitter.

The six-term former governor of Vermont appeared tailored for a return to the DNC and the post he first filled in 2005. But much had changed since Dean left the DNC in 2009, with Obama in the White House and Dean still a lodestar for the progressive base of the party.

Upon his announcement, he was flogged for everything from his endorsement of Hillary Clinton to his…


Worried the next presidential debate will be too white, backers of Elizabeth Warren are giving to Julian Castro to keep his campaign alive

Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro speaks at CNN’s presidential town hall on October 10, 2019.
Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro speaks at CNN’s presidential town hall on October 10, 2019.
Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro at CNN’s presidential town hall on October 10, 2019. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty

Julián Castro has a plea to voters: Help him raise $800,000 by October 31, or he will be forced to drop out of the Democratic presidential primary. The former Housing and Urban Development secretary says that without this funding, his campaign won’t be able to meet the polling cut-off for the next debate, on November 20. Castro, whose bid is a long shot to begin with, argues that losing his spot on the debate stage would make it unlikely that his campaign continues into the Iowa caucuses in February.

This isn’t the first time Castro’s campaign has warned the end…

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